EconFact 3/29 – Let them them fail

http://www.npr.org/blogs/money/2013/10/10/230914894/what-a-u-s-default-would-mean-for-pensions-china-and-social-security

What bond looks like

The other big story in the Emerging Market (EM) world aside from the conflict in Ukraine/Russian conflict is the changing nature of the Chinese economy. The 2013 3rd Plenum, a meeting of Communist Party’s Central Committee, seemed to suggest a more market-driven philosophy to guiding China’s economy moving forward having massive consequences for China going forward.

This week, I’ll be focusing on China.

Why a default may be a good thing

On March 7th, something remarkable happened in the Chinese corporate bond market (I know, it sounds awesomely interesting, right?) – a Chinese corporate bond failed for the first time in history.

Just a quick rehash, a bond is basically an “I-O-U”  from a company to an investor. Investopedia does a great job explaining it:

The indebted entity (issuer) issues a bond that states the interest rate(coupon) that will be paid and when the loaned funds (bond principal) are to be returned (maturity date). Interest on bonds is usually paid every six months (semi-annually). 

The bolded words are my emphasis. Reason why I included that explanation is that when I say ” a corporate bond failed” I mean that a Chinese corporation, in this case a Shanghai based solar panel company named Shanghai Chaori Solar, did not pay back its interest payments, around $15 million USD, at a previously agreed upon date implying that the company does not have enough funds to do so. In other words, they defaulted.

Now, since China started its bond market in the 1990s, there have been some technical defaults among Chinese corporations, meaning that the interests payments have been made but some other clause of the bond contract was not upheld (to be fair, the United States has technically defaulted as well BUT NOT CANADA).

China’s somewhat default-free debt market is not due to all of the companies being financially responsible but rather a lot of them being bailed out by the Chinese Central Government before defaulting. Thus, March 7’s Chaori serves as a warning shot to Chinese corporations to get their fiscal house in order because they may not be bailed out anymore. In fact, China’s premier Li Keqiang warned that this may be the year corporate defaults as China ramps up its financial regulation. Indeed, this is a warning instead of a disaster since the Chinese government has noted defaults will be “controlled” in order to prevent systemic banking risk.

Going forward, this is just another part of China’s effort to “liberalize” its economy by letting the market, rather than government intervention, determine the credit-worthiness of Chinese corporations.

Read more:
Forbes – Some of the implications of China restructuring its corporate bond market.

Also:
Los Angeles Review of Books – A great analysis on how HBO’s Girls treats work.

Advertisements

EconFact 3/21 – RMB FX WTF?

Uh Oh

Uh Oh

The other big story in the Emerging Market (EM) world aside from the conflict in Ukraine/Russian conflict is the changing nature of the Chinese economy. The 2013 3rd Plenum, a meeting of Communist Party’s Central Committee, seemed to suggest a more market-driven philosophy to guiding China’s economy moving forward having massive consequences for China going forward. This week, I’ll be focusing on China.

So far, like other aspects of the Chinese economy, the RMB, has been state-controlled. China’s currency has been pegged to the US dollar at roughly 8 RMB to the dollar. Since exports are a large party of the Chinese economy – this matters greatly; a cheaper RMB (also known as Yuan/CNY) means cheaper, more competitive exports. However, currencies tend to appreciate with more exports, that is, with more Chinese exports in the global market, they should rise in price but the Chinese government has kept the currency artificially low by acquiring foreign reserves and thus masking the market value of the RMB for some time.

In 2005, under pressure from trading partners, China moved to a “managed float” system where the currency was allowed to have more volatile appreciation and the currency moved from 8 – 6.8 RMB/Dollar. The Chinese government stabilized the currency in 2008 due to the financial crisis but resumed appreciation trend in June 2010. During those times, daily volatility of the currency was limited at 0.5% per day.

In 2012 daily volatility moved to 1% and now it’s announced that 2% band for the RMB is possible. This is seen as a move to internationalize the RMB and for it to move closer to its market price. This move has already seen making a huge impact in the FX market (see chart).

EconFact 3/20: Slowing Dragon

 

20140320-093048.jpg

The other big story in the Emerging Market (EM) world aside from the conflict in Ukraine/Russian conflict is the changing nature of the Chinese economy. The 2013 3rd Plenum, a meeting of Communist Party’s Central Committee, seemed to suggest a more market-driven philosophy to guiding China’s economy moving forward having massive consequences for China going forward.

This week, I’ll be focusing on China.

Slower, but more more stable growth

It’s not secret that China is slowing down. The average annual year-over-year GDP growth over the last 30 years has been around 10.14% but the last few years have seen a downward GDP trend. The most recent annual GDP number is 7.7% for 2012 and the finance officials forecast an even lower projection of 7.5% GDP growth for 2014. The PMI Manufacturing Index and Industrial Production numbers for China has so far disappointment in 2014.

But a lower GDP may be a good thing for China.

Growth in China has been so far been credit-fueled and investment-ledmeaning that you have entities borrowing from investors to fund projects, especially property developments. However, this frenzy in simply building things with borrowed money can lead to the misallocation of capital personified by the rise ghost cities.

Investment has been a crucial, but unsustainable part of growth because it incurs debt: provincial government debt and the increase of shadow-banking, unregulated, off-balance sheet banking interactions. While providing additional liquidity, a lack of regulation and transparency threatens the stability of the overall financial system.  So far, the central government has taken action in auditing provincial government financial activity but it’s unclear how much transparency there will be going forward.

A transition to a more consumer-led growth will provide a stable and fundamentally-led growth for the economy but probably not result in double-digit growth numbers we’re used to from China.

EconView 09/11: Never forget to Vote

Classy Voting

Classy Voting

As a New Yorker, I paid attention to the results of the mayoral primaries showing public advocate Bill DeBlasio representing Democrats and MTA-head Joe Lhota representing the Republicans in the Nov. 5 election. I, like a lot of residents of New York, cannot vote but I strongly believe in the process.  That’s why I was a little annoyed at piece written by a current student of my alma mater (well, kind of) who wrote that she would “turn [her] attention away ” from the election because “modern American politics has become an absolute bore”.

I wrote a slightly overkill response:

Dear Ms. Lerner,

I appreciate you writing an article about your thoughts on New York and American politics but I have to heartily disagree with your thesis that “modern American politics has become an absolute bore” even at the mayoral level.

Never mind the fact that the president has asked Congress, something that hasn’t been done since WWII, to vote on entering another conflict in the Middle East. Syria was also a sticking point for the past presidential election which, as you suggested, was overshadowed my Donald Trump by some voters. But, let’s focus this on NYC.

You wrote about how there should be more efficient subways and a MetroCard discount, great ideas. The Republican primary winner, Joe Lhota, used to be the head of the MTA and has given controversial pay raises to MTA employees resulting in 8,000 employees of the MTA earning more than 6 figures. Mr. Lhota’s past experience certainly be a factor for his candidacy. But you declared yourself a Democrat so let’s talk about the Democrats especially since New York’s Democrats outnumber Republicans 6:1.

The major sticking point of the Democratic primary debates was the policy of stop-and-frisk which, according to Mayor Bloomberg, has made the city safer but may not be unconstitutional. Mr. DeBlasio, seemingly the Democratic candidate, calls to stop the policy but that’s very different than what Mr. Weiner or Ms. Quinn, who were both front runners of the Race before Mr. DeBlasio rose to the lead one month ago, believe. You also called for investing in underprivileged students and infrastructure but should New York tax its citizens more or allocate resources from other departments? Each candidate, Democrat or not, has widely different views and policies.

I share your frustration with the tabloidization of politics but there definitely is meaningful discussion to be had after listening and analyzing what each candidate has to say. Being the mayor of the biggest city in America has consequences for each student of Columbia and citizen of New York City. Instead of, turning away from the discussion, I really encourage you to go out and be informed about the differences in policy and rhetoric between the now two candidates for the office.

I do live in the city but don’t have the privilege of voting for its mayor so I really hope voters like yourself are making the best possible decision for the future of New York.

Sincerely,

Paul Hsiao

Takeaway: Elections have consequences. Know why.

Also: 

Never Forget.

Continue reading